IAS Film Series 2018-2019

The film series marks its thirty-fourth year this season. All films are shown free of charge in Wolfensohn Hall and are open to the Institute Community. The series intends to offer the opportunity to hear from the producers, creators, and curators of film.

Crisis and Critique
A FILM SERIES CURATED BY THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE

For the past four years, the School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, collaborating with the Institute Film Series, has been curating films related to the theme studied in the School during the year. For 2018-2019, the theme “Crisis and Critique,” coordinated by Professor Didier Fassin and Professor Axel Honneth, will explore, from a critical and global perspective, the ubiquitous discourse on crisis as well as the multiple dimensions of crises. The series will feature 6 films this year, the first film is Inside Job.

Next film:

Tuesday, October 9, 4 PM - Wolfensohn Hall
Inside Job directed by Charles Ferguson

Post screening discussion will be led by Clara Mattei, Assistant Professor of Economics in the New School for Social Research. This event is free.

Directed by Charles Ferguson, Inside Job explores the systemic sources of the 2008 financial crisis. The film weaves together interviews to illustrate how the global meltdown that caused millions of job losses and house evictions was made possible by a number of structural factors, including the role of respected economists from Ivy League universities who were hired by banks to support imprudent deregulation. Indeed, following the story from Iceland to China to the United States, the film shows the growing confusion between academia, business and government. It was screened at the Cannes Festival in 2010 and won an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature that same year. “It is a story of a crime without punishment," wrote A. O. Scott in The New York Times. "Mr. Ferguson has summoned the scourging moral force of a pulpit-shaking sermon. That he delivers it with rigor, restraint and good humor makes his case all the more devastating.” 

The film runs 1 hour and 48 minutes.

 

 


 

Films will be listed as they are scheduled. Please send your suggestions to:

    thank you!

These events are free and open to the Institute community. Please note that food is not allowed in Wolfensohn Hall.